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Horse 1

Horse 1

A Blackfeet Reservation horse is profiled on the windswept foothills of Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. The horse was introduced to the Blackfeet on the Northern Plains around 1730 and they called them "ponokamita" which means "elk dog." Since then, and still to this day, the horse has been of vital importance to their mobility, identity, and culture.

Bison 12

Bison 12

An American Bison lays in the National Bison Range located in the Mission Valley of western Montana. During a time when bison were reduced from populations of tens of millions to fewer than 100 in the wild, this important refuge was established in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt to ensure this iconic animal continued to exist in its native habitat. Today a herd of nearly 500 continue to thrive at the National Bison Range.

Bison 11

Bison 11

An American Bison stands in the National Bison Range located in the Mission Valley of western Montana. During a time when bison were reduced from populations of tens of millions to fewer than 100 in the wild, this important refuge was established in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt to ensure this iconic animal continued to exist in its native habitat. Today a herd of nearly 500 continue to thrive at the National Bison Range.

Bison 1

Bison 1

Two American Bison stand in Wind Cave National Park in South Dakota, USA. After widespread slaughter brought bison to near extinction, the American Bison Society sought to establish a heard at Wind Cave N.P. to ensure the iconic animal’s continued existence in its natural habitat. In 1913, fourteen once wild bison were brought from the New York City Zoo to Wind Cave N.P. to re-establish the heard which continues to thrive there today.

Bighorn Sheep 2

Bighorn Sheep 2

A herd of bighorn sheep stand at attention on the dry foothills of Lake County in western Montana, USA. Sheep crossed the Bering land bridge about 750,000 years ago and populations peaked in the millions. By 1900 bighorn sheep in North America had been reduced to just several thousand due. Aided by conservation groups, better management plans, and national parks, the bighorn once again thrives here.A herd of bighorn sheep stand in western Montana, USA.

Bighorn Sheep 3

Bighorn Sheep 3

A herd of Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep stand at attention in western Montana, USA. 

Bighorn Lamb 1

Bighorn Lamb 1

A bighorn sheep lamb grazes on mountain wildflowers atop Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA.Bighorns have balance-aiding split hooves and rough hoof bottoms for natural grip. These attributes, along with keen vision, help them move easily about rocky, rugged mountain terrain. This young lamb was quite content to graze along a sheer cliff which dropped down to Hidden Lake below.

Bison 13

Bison 13

A young calf nurses in Wind Cave National Park in South Dakota, USA. After widespread slaughter brought bison to near extinction, the American Bison Society sought to establish a heard at Wind Cave N.P. to ensure the iconic animal’s continued existance in its natural habitat. In 1913, fourteen once wild bison were brought from the New York City Zoo to Wind Cave N.P. to re-establish the heard which continues to thrive there today.A bison calf nurses at Wind Cave National Park.

Bison 7

Bison 7

An American Bison stands in the Hayden Valley of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. This bull is shedding his winter fur. A bison’s fur coat is highly insulative and is essential in their survival in extremely harsh winter conditions. In fact, it is so thermally efficient, often snow will not melt on it because they retain so much of their body’s heat.A bison in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA.

Bison 3

Bison 3

A bison in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA.

Elk 1

Elk 1

A bull elk tries to herd his harem along the Gardiner River in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Over 30 elk in this herd were grazing along the river. As more and more people took notice and a crowd began to grow this bull wanted the others to move further away from the crowd. Through is loud bugling and intensive posturing he very effectively got over 30 other elk to move across the river to a comfortable distance from the crowd. 

Sandhill Cranes 1

Sandhill Cranes 1

One of the most beautiful natural phenomena in the United States is the annual congregation of the sandhill cranes. For about a month each March, over 500,000 sandhill cranes converge on the Platte River basin in Nebraska to rest and eat before they finish their migration to their northern breeding grounds. These large birds are seen frequently in Montana and typically are seen in pairs since they remain together with the same mate for life. 

Blue Heron 1

Blue Heron 1

A great blue heron prepares for flight along the famed Madison River in Montana. 

Horse 5

Horse 5

A Blackfeet Reservation horse is profiled during sunset on the foothills of Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. The horse was introduced to the Blackfeet on the Northern Plains around 1730 and they called them "ponokamita" which means "elk dog." Since then, and still to this day, the horse has been of vital importance to their mobility, identity, and culture.

Horse 13

Horse 13

A horse is profiled on a ranch near West Yellowstone, Montana. 

Horse 7

Horse 7

A horse along the windswept Rocky Mountain Front, where the expansive prairie slams into the towering Northern Rockies in Western Montana.

Horse 6

Horse 6

A horse along the windswept Rocky Mountain Front, where the expansive prairie slams into the towering Northern Rockies in Western Montana.

Horse 3

Horse 3

A Blackfeet Reservation horse is profiled during sunset on the windswept foothills of Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. The horse was introduced to the Blackfeet on the Northern Plains around 1730 and they called them "ponokamita" which means "elk dog." Since then, and still to this day, the horse has been of vital importance to their mobility, identity, and culture.

Horse 12

Horse 12

A Blackfeet Reservation horse is profiled during sunset on the windswept foothills of Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. The horse was introduced to the Blackfeet on the Northern Plains around 1730 and they called them "ponokamita" which means "elk dog." Since then, and still to this day, the horse has been of vital importance to their mobility, identity, and culture.

Horse 10

Horse 10

A Blackfeet Reservation horse is profiled along the wind-swept foothills of Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. 

Grant Tetons 13

Grant Tetons 13

Horses graze along the iconic Teton Range of Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929. John D. Rockefeller aided greatly by purchasing land to turn over to the Park Service. 

Grand Tetons 14

Grand Tetons 14

Horses graze along the iconic Teton Range of Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929. John D. Rockefeller aided greatly by purchasing land to turn over to the Park Service. 

Horse 11

Horse 11

A Blackfeet Reservation horse runs in the early morning light along Montana's Rocky Mountain Front. 

Bison 5

Bison 5

An American Bison stands in the haze of distant wildfires in the Hayden Valley of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. This bull is shedding his winter fur. A bison’s fur coat is highly insulative and is essential in their survival in extremely harsh winter conditions. In fact, it is so thermally efficient, often snow will not melt on it because they retain so much of their body’s heat.A lone bull stands in the early morning in Hayden Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. Smoke from distant wild fires created the hazy background.

Bison 4

Bison 4

Two American Bison stand in the Hayden Valley of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. Smoke from distant wildfires provided the hazy backdrop to this tense scene in which two bulls were attempting to establish their dominance in the late summer rut - a social process whereby males court and sometimes physically duel over females whom they wish to reproduce with. This particular standoff ended without physical conflict.Two bulls shared a tense standoff in Yellowstone National Park’s Hayden Valley, located in Wyoming, USA. Smoke from distant forest fires provided the hazy backdrop

Bison 2

Bison 2

An American Bison rises from the dust of its wallow in Hayden Valley of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. Wallows are shallow depressions of dirt which bison use by rolling on their backs. They are thought to perform this for various reasons including alleviating itches from insects, helping to shed their fur coat, and it’s even thought to be part of the courting ritual during the annul rut.A bison rises from the dust stirred from its wallowing. Taken in Hayden Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA.

Bison 6

Bison 6

An American Bison stands in the National Bison Range Wildlife Refuge located in the Mission Valley of western Montana, USA. During a time when bison were reduced from populations of tens of millions to fewer than 100 in the wild, this important refuge was established in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt to ensure this iconic animal continued to exist in its native habitat. Today nearly 500 bison continue to thrive there.A bison stands in National Bison Range Wildlife Refuge in western Montana, USA.

Bison 14

Bison 14

An American Bison stands in the National Bison Range Wildlife Refuge located in the Mission Valley of western Montana, USA. During a time when bison were reduced from populations of tens of millions to fewer than 100 in the wild, this important refuge was established in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt to ensure this iconic animal continued to exist in its native habitat. Today nearly 500 bison continue to thrive there.

Bison 15

Bison 15

“Bison 15” - A lone bull stands in the early morning in Hayden Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. Smoke from distant wild fires created the hazy background.

Mission Mountains 2

Mission Mountains 2

The towering Mission Mountains provide the backdrop as a lone bison stands in the National Bison Range in western Montana. 

Horse 1

A Blackfeet Reservation horse is profiled on the windswept foothills of Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. The horse was introduced to the Blackfeet on the Northern Plains around 1730 and they called them "ponokamita" which means "elk dog." Since then, and still to this day, the horse has been of vital importance to their mobility, identity, and culture.

Bison 12

An American Bison lays in the National Bison Range located in the Mission Valley of western Montana. During a time when bison were reduced from populations of tens of millions to fewer than 100 in the wild, this important refuge was established in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt to ensure this iconic animal continued to exist in its native habitat. Today a herd of nearly 500 continue to thrive at the National Bison Range.

Bison 11

An American Bison stands in the National Bison Range located in the Mission Valley of western Montana. During a time when bison were reduced from populations of tens of millions to fewer than 100 in the wild, this important refuge was established in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt to ensure this iconic animal continued to exist in its native habitat. Today a herd of nearly 500 continue to thrive at the National Bison Range.

Bison 1

Two American Bison stand in Wind Cave National Park in South Dakota, USA. After widespread slaughter brought bison to near extinction, the American Bison Society sought to establish a heard at Wind Cave N.P. to ensure the iconic animal’s continued existence in its natural habitat. In 1913, fourteen once wild bison were brought from the New York City Zoo to Wind Cave N.P. to re-establish the heard which continues to thrive there today.

Bighorn Sheep 2

A herd of bighorn sheep stand at attention on the dry foothills of Lake County in western Montana, USA. Sheep crossed the Bering land bridge about 750,000 years ago and populations peaked in the millions. By 1900 bighorn sheep in North America had been reduced to just several thousand due. Aided by conservation groups, better management plans, and national parks, the bighorn once again thrives here.A herd of bighorn sheep stand in western Montana, USA.

Bighorn Sheep 3

A herd of Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep stand at attention in western Montana, USA. 

Bighorn Lamb 1

A bighorn sheep lamb grazes on mountain wildflowers atop Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA.Bighorns have balance-aiding split hooves and rough hoof bottoms for natural grip. These attributes, along with keen vision, help them move easily about rocky, rugged mountain terrain. This young lamb was quite content to graze along a sheer cliff which dropped down to Hidden Lake below.

Bison 13

A young calf nurses in Wind Cave National Park in South Dakota, USA. After widespread slaughter brought bison to near extinction, the American Bison Society sought to establish a heard at Wind Cave N.P. to ensure the iconic animal’s continued existance in its natural habitat. In 1913, fourteen once wild bison were brought from the New York City Zoo to Wind Cave N.P. to re-establish the heard which continues to thrive there today.A bison calf nurses at Wind Cave National Park.

Bison 7

An American Bison stands in the Hayden Valley of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. This bull is shedding his winter fur. A bison’s fur coat is highly insulative and is essential in their survival in extremely harsh winter conditions. In fact, it is so thermally efficient, often snow will not melt on it because they retain so much of their body’s heat.A bison in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA.

Bison 3

A bison in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA.

Elk 1

A bull elk tries to herd his harem along the Gardiner River in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Over 30 elk in this herd were grazing along the river. As more and more people took notice and a crowd began to grow this bull wanted the others to move further away from the crowd. Through is loud bugling and intensive posturing he very effectively got over 30 other elk to move across the river to a comfortable distance from the crowd. 

Sandhill Cranes 1

One of the most beautiful natural phenomena in the United States is the annual congregation of the sandhill cranes. For about a month each March, over 500,000 sandhill cranes converge on the Platte River basin in Nebraska to rest and eat before they finish their migration to their northern breeding grounds. These large birds are seen frequently in Montana and typically are seen in pairs since they remain together with the same mate for life. 

Blue Heron 1

A great blue heron prepares for flight along the famed Madison River in Montana. 

Horse 5

A Blackfeet Reservation horse is profiled during sunset on the foothills of Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. The horse was introduced to the Blackfeet on the Northern Plains around 1730 and they called them "ponokamita" which means "elk dog." Since then, and still to this day, the horse has been of vital importance to their mobility, identity, and culture.

Horse 13

A horse is profiled on a ranch near West Yellowstone, Montana. 

Horse 7

A horse along the windswept Rocky Mountain Front, where the expansive prairie slams into the towering Northern Rockies in Western Montana.

Horse 6

A horse along the windswept Rocky Mountain Front, where the expansive prairie slams into the towering Northern Rockies in Western Montana.

Horse 3

A Blackfeet Reservation horse is profiled during sunset on the windswept foothills of Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. The horse was introduced to the Blackfeet on the Northern Plains around 1730 and they called them "ponokamita" which means "elk dog." Since then, and still to this day, the horse has been of vital importance to their mobility, identity, and culture.

Horse 12

A Blackfeet Reservation horse is profiled during sunset on the windswept foothills of Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. The horse was introduced to the Blackfeet on the Northern Plains around 1730 and they called them "ponokamita" which means "elk dog." Since then, and still to this day, the horse has been of vital importance to their mobility, identity, and culture.

Horse 10

A Blackfeet Reservation horse is profiled along the wind-swept foothills of Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. 

Grant Tetons 13

Horses graze along the iconic Teton Range of Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929. John D. Rockefeller aided greatly by purchasing land to turn over to the Park Service. 

Grand Tetons 14

Horses graze along the iconic Teton Range of Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929. John D. Rockefeller aided greatly by purchasing land to turn over to the Park Service. 

Horse 11

A Blackfeet Reservation horse runs in the early morning light along Montana's Rocky Mountain Front. 

Bison 5

An American Bison stands in the haze of distant wildfires in the Hayden Valley of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. This bull is shedding his winter fur. A bison’s fur coat is highly insulative and is essential in their survival in extremely harsh winter conditions. In fact, it is so thermally efficient, often snow will not melt on it because they retain so much of their body’s heat.A lone bull stands in the early morning in Hayden Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. Smoke from distant wild fires created the hazy background.

Bison 4

Two American Bison stand in the Hayden Valley of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. Smoke from distant wildfires provided the hazy backdrop to this tense scene in which two bulls were attempting to establish their dominance in the late summer rut - a social process whereby males court and sometimes physically duel over females whom they wish to reproduce with. This particular standoff ended without physical conflict.Two bulls shared a tense standoff in Yellowstone National Park’s Hayden Valley, located in Wyoming, USA. Smoke from distant forest fires provided the hazy backdrop

Bison 2

An American Bison rises from the dust of its wallow in Hayden Valley of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. Wallows are shallow depressions of dirt which bison use by rolling on their backs. They are thought to perform this for various reasons including alleviating itches from insects, helping to shed their fur coat, and it’s even thought to be part of the courting ritual during the annul rut.A bison rises from the dust stirred from its wallowing. Taken in Hayden Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA.

Bison 6

An American Bison stands in the National Bison Range Wildlife Refuge located in the Mission Valley of western Montana, USA. During a time when bison were reduced from populations of tens of millions to fewer than 100 in the wild, this important refuge was established in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt to ensure this iconic animal continued to exist in its native habitat. Today nearly 500 bison continue to thrive there.A bison stands in National Bison Range Wildlife Refuge in western Montana, USA.

Bison 14

An American Bison stands in the National Bison Range Wildlife Refuge located in the Mission Valley of western Montana, USA. During a time when bison were reduced from populations of tens of millions to fewer than 100 in the wild, this important refuge was established in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt to ensure this iconic animal continued to exist in its native habitat. Today nearly 500 bison continue to thrive there.

Bison 15

“Bison 15” - A lone bull stands in the early morning in Hayden Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. Smoke from distant wild fires created the hazy background.

Mission Mountains 2

The towering Mission Mountains provide the backdrop as a lone bison stands in the National Bison Range in western Montana. 

Horse 1
Bison 12
Bison 11
Bison 1
Bighorn Sheep 2
Bighorn Sheep 3
Bighorn Lamb 1
Bison 13
Bison 7
Bison 3
Elk 1
Sandhill Cranes 1
Blue Heron 1
Horse 5
Horse 13
Horse 7
Horse 6
Horse 3
Horse 12
Horse 10
Grant Tetons 13
Grand Tetons 14
Horse 11
Bison 5
Bison 4
Bison 2
Bison 6
Bison 14
Bison 15
Mission Mountains 2