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Mormon Row 1

Mormon Row 1

An icon of the Jackson Hole Valley, Mormon Row stands in the shadows of the mighty Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. The structures of Mormon Row, which include this stucco home situated next to the infamous Moulton Barn, were homesteaded in 1907 & used for ranching up through 1961. They now reside within Grand Teton National Park. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929.

Mormon Row 2

Mormon Row 2

The windows of the abandoned pink stucco house along Mormon Row in Grand Teton National Park. An icon of the Jackson Hole Valley, Mormon Row stands in the shadows of the mighty Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. The structures of Mormon Row, which include this stucco home situated next to the infamous Moulton Barn, were homesteaded in 1907 & used for ranching up through 1961. They now reside within Grand Teton National Park. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929.
 

Mormon Row 3

Mormon Row 3

An icon of the Jackson Hole Valley, Mormon Row stands in the shadows of the mighty Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. The structures of Mormon Row, which include this stucco home situated next to the infamous Moulton Barn, were homesteaded in 1907 & used for ranching up through 1961. They now reside within Grand Teton National Park. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929.

Grand Teton 4

Grand Teton 4

An icon of Jackson Hole, the John Moulton Barn sits along "Mormon Row" in the shadows of the mighty Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. Now located within Grand Teton National Park, the Moulton Barn was homesteaded in 1907 & was used for ranching up through 1961. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929. John D. Rockefeller aided greatly by purchasing land to turn over to the Park Service.

Grand Teton 5

Grand Teton 5

An icon of Jackson Hole, the John Moulton Barn sits along "Mormon Row" in the shadows of the Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. Now located within Grand Teton National Park, the Moulton Barn was homesteaded in 1907 & was used for ranching up through 1961. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929. John D. Rockefeller aided greatly by purchasing land to turn over to the Park Service.

T.A. Moulton Barn 1

T.A. Moulton Barn 1

An icon of Jackson Hole, the T.A. Moulton Barn sits along "Mormon Row" in the shadows of the mighty Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. Now located within Grand Teton National Park, the Moulton Barn was homesteaded in 1907 & was used for ranching up through 1961. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929. John D. Rockefeller aided greatly by purchasing land to turn over to the Park Service.

Grand Tetons 15

Grand Tetons 15

An icon of Jackson Hole, the T.A. Moulton Barn sits along "Mormon Row" in the shadows of the mighty Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. Now located within Grand Teton National Park, the Moulton Barn was homesteaded in 1907 & was used for ranching up through 1961. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929. John D. Rockefeller aided greatly by purchasing land to turn over to the Park Service.

Ghost Town 9

Ghost Town 9

The empty lobby of the abandoned Hotel Meade in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana, USA. The building was originally constructed in 1875 to servve as the Beaverhead County Courthouse. But after the gold rush subsided populations shifted and Bannack lost its position as County Seat. In 1890 the building was turned into a plush hotel and operated until it was finally abandoned for good in the 1940s.The lobby of the abandoned Hotel Meade in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana, USA.

Hotel Meade 1

Hotel Meade 1

The exquisite lines and delicately aged colors add to the opulence of the Hotel Meade's grand staircase in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana. The building was originally constructed in 1875 to serve as the Beaverhead County Courthouse. But after the gold rush subsided populations shifted and Bannack lost its position as County Seat. In 1890 the building was turned into a plush hotel and operated until it was finally abandoned for good in the 1940s. 

Ghost Town 10

Ghost Town 10

The illuminated staircase of the abandoned Hotel Meade in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana, USA. The building was originally constructed in 1875 to serve as the Beaverhead County Courthouse. But after the gold rush subsided populations shifted and Bannack lost its position as County Seat. In 1890 the building was turned into a plush hotel and operated until it was finally abandoned for good in the 1940s.

Ghost Town 11

Ghost Town 11

The illuminated staircase of the abandoned Hotel Meade in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana, USA. The building was originally constructed in 1875 to serve as the Beaverhead County Courthouse. But after the gold rush subsided populations shifted and Bannack lost its position as County Seat. In 1890 the building was turned into a plush hotel and operated until it was finally abandoned for good in the 1940s.

Buffalo Ranch 1

Buffalo Ranch 1

Autumn cottonwood trees punctuate the landscape along Yellowstone National Park's historic Buffalo Ranch. When bison populations in the park were reduced to fewer than 30 animals, and bison extinction was very possible in the U.S., the Buffalo Ranch was built to help protect and grow the few bison that remained. From 1907 to 1952 this ranch served a crucial role in protecting bison through the winters so that they could grow into the vast and healthy populations that we enjoy today. The Buffalo Ranch is on the National Register of Historic Places. 

Railroad One

Railroad One

An abandoned grain elevator stands as a relic along the tracks of the northern prairie in Montana, USA. In a land once claimed by the Blackfeet Indians, the vast and sparse prairie land eventually gave way to the expansion of Manifest Destiny. Homesteads, mines, ranches, and steamboats all made their way westward onto the prairie. But it was the railroad that proved to be so vital, finally connecting the ports of Seattle and New York.

Menard, Montana 2

Menard, Montana 2

Menard, Montana (north of Belgrade) was the terminus of the Milwaukee Railroad branch-line from Bozeman to the rural communities to the north. The railroad was named "The Turkey Red Special" for the variety of wheat raised here. It connected these communities to the Gallatin from 1913-1978. 

Railroad 2

Railroad 2

An abandoned grain elevator stands as a relic along the tracks of the northern prairie in Montana's Teton County. In a land once claimed by the Blackfeet Indians, the vast and sparse prairie land eventually gave way to the expansion of Manifest Destiny. Homesteads, mines, ranches, and steamboats all made their way westward onto the prairie. But it was the railroad that proved to be so vital, finally connecting the ports of Seattle and New York.

Menard, Montana 1

Menard, Montana 1

Menard, Montana (north of Belgrade) was the terminus of the Milwaukee Railroad branch-line from Bozeman to the rural communities to the north. The railroad was named "The Turkey Red Special" for the variety of wheat raised here. It connected these communities to the Gallatin from 1913-1978. 

Grain Elevator 1

Grain Elevator 1

This old elevator sits along what once was the Milwaukee Railroad branch-line from Bozeman to the rural communities to the north. The railroad was named "The Turkey Red Special" for the variety of wheat that was grown here. The raiI connected these communities to the Gallatin from 1913-1978. 

Grain Elevator 1

Grain Elevator 1

Pictured is one of the numerous, yet waning, iconic grain elevators which dot the plains as relics of the homesteading years on the northern prairie. The Homestead Act of 1862, signed by President Abraham Lincoln, paved the way for Montana to be the most heavily homesteaded state in America at the time. Though times of drought and economic hardship drove many away, many tough and hearty souls remained and continue the traditions of farming and ranching here today.

Geyser, Montana

Geyser, Montana

One of the numerous, yet waning, iconic grain elevators which dot the plains as relics of the homesteading years on the northern prairie. The Homestead Act of 1862, signed by President Abraham Lincoln, paved the way for Montana to be the most heavily homesteaded state in America at the time. Though times of drought and economic hardship drove many away, many tough and hearty souls remained and continue the traditions of farming and ranching here today.

Ghost Town 1

Ghost Town 1

The kitchen, with original stove, of the long abandoned Hotel Meade in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana, USA. The building was originally constructed in 1875 to serve as the Beaverhead County Courthouse, but in 1890 the building was turned into a plush hotel and operated until it was finally abandoned for good in the 1940s. The cabin seen through the window has taken on a watercolor look due to the original leaded glass windows.

Ghost Town 2

Ghost Town 2

Snow falls on the main street boardwalk of Bannack, Montana, USA. Located on Grasshopper Creek in Beaverhead County, Bannack was established after gold was found there in 1862. It briefly served as the capital of the Montana Territory and at its peak Bannack had a population of around 10,000. But after the gold rush folks began departing steadily until its last residents left for good in the 1970s.

Barber Chair

Barber Chair

This original barber chair sits in Skinner’s Saloon in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana, USA. Located on Grasshopper Creek in Beaverhead County, Bannack was established after gold was found there in 1862. It briefly served as the capital of the Montana Territory and at its peak Bannack had a population of around 10,000. But after the gold rush folks began departing steadily until its last residents left for good in the 1970s.

Ghsot Town 3

Ghsot Town 3

Snow falls on the main street boardwalk of Bannack, Montana, USA. Located on Grasshopper Creek in Beaverhead County, Bannack was established after gold was found there in 1862. It briefly served as the capital of the Montana Territory and at its peak Bannack had a population of around 10,000. But after the gold rush folks began departing steadily until its last residents left for good in the 1970s.

Ghost Town 12

Ghost Town 12

Located on Grasshopper Creek in Beaverhead County, Montana, Bannack was established after gold was found there in 1862. It briefly served as the capital of the Montana Territory and at its peak Bannack had a population of around 10,000. But after the gold rush folks began departing steadily until its last residents left for good in the 1970s.

Abandoned Homestead 4

Abandoned Homestead 4

A long-abandoned homestead sits under the Big Sky on the Montana prairie. The Homestead Act of 1862, signed by President Abraham Lincoln, paved the way for Montana to be the most heavily homesteaded state in America at the time. Though times of drought and economic hardship drove many away, some tough and hearty souls remained and continue the traditions of farming and ranching there today.

Abandoned Homestead 4

Abandoned Homestead 4

A long-abandoned homestead sits under the Big Sky on the Montana prairie. The Homestead Act of 1862, signed by President Abraham Lincoln, paved the way for Montana to be the most heavily homesteaded state in America at the time. Though times of drought and economic hardship drove many away, some tough and hearty souls remained and continue the traditions of farming and ranching there today.

Virginia City 4

Virginia City 4

Methodist Church in historic Virginia City, Montana. The church was built in 1875 and the first service it held was the funeral for Alder Gulch discoverer William Fairweather. SINGLE SERIES PRINT: this photograph is part of my "Single Series" which means it is printed one time and one time only. This piece is currently available. It has been printed on a n exquisite Silk Satin material and has a custom frame. Please inquire directly for pricing and additional photos of the finished piece. 

Virginia City 5

Virginia City 5

Methodist Church in historic Virginia City, Montana. The church was built in 1875 and the first service it held was the funeral for Alder Gulch discoverer William Fairweather. 

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Wallpaper 1

Wallpaper 1

Wallpaper inside an abandoned home in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana. 

Wallpaper 2

Wallpaper 2

Wallpaper that remains in an abandoned Montana prairie homestead. 

Mormon Row 1

An icon of the Jackson Hole Valley, Mormon Row stands in the shadows of the mighty Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. The structures of Mormon Row, which include this stucco home situated next to the infamous Moulton Barn, were homesteaded in 1907 & used for ranching up through 1961. They now reside within Grand Teton National Park. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929.

Mormon Row 2

The windows of the abandoned pink stucco house along Mormon Row in Grand Teton National Park. An icon of the Jackson Hole Valley, Mormon Row stands in the shadows of the mighty Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. The structures of Mormon Row, which include this stucco home situated next to the infamous Moulton Barn, were homesteaded in 1907 & used for ranching up through 1961. They now reside within Grand Teton National Park. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929.
 

Mormon Row 3

An icon of the Jackson Hole Valley, Mormon Row stands in the shadows of the mighty Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. The structures of Mormon Row, which include this stucco home situated next to the infamous Moulton Barn, were homesteaded in 1907 & used for ranching up through 1961. They now reside within Grand Teton National Park. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929.

Grand Teton 4

An icon of Jackson Hole, the John Moulton Barn sits along "Mormon Row" in the shadows of the mighty Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. Now located within Grand Teton National Park, the Moulton Barn was homesteaded in 1907 & was used for ranching up through 1961. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929. John D. Rockefeller aided greatly by purchasing land to turn over to the Park Service.

Grand Teton 5

An icon of Jackson Hole, the John Moulton Barn sits along "Mormon Row" in the shadows of the Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. Now located within Grand Teton National Park, the Moulton Barn was homesteaded in 1907 & was used for ranching up through 1961. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929. John D. Rockefeller aided greatly by purchasing land to turn over to the Park Service.

T.A. Moulton Barn 1

An icon of Jackson Hole, the T.A. Moulton Barn sits along "Mormon Row" in the shadows of the mighty Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. Now located within Grand Teton National Park, the Moulton Barn was homesteaded in 1907 & was used for ranching up through 1961. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929. John D. Rockefeller aided greatly by purchasing land to turn over to the Park Service.

Grand Tetons 15

An icon of Jackson Hole, the T.A. Moulton Barn sits along "Mormon Row" in the shadows of the mighty Teton Range in western Wyoming, USA. Now located within Grand Teton National Park, the Moulton Barn was homesteaded in 1907 & was used for ranching up through 1961. Recognizing the need to preserve this majestic area from further development, President Calvin Coolidge granted it National Park status in 1929. John D. Rockefeller aided greatly by purchasing land to turn over to the Park Service.

Ghost Town 9

The empty lobby of the abandoned Hotel Meade in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana, USA. The building was originally constructed in 1875 to servve as the Beaverhead County Courthouse. But after the gold rush subsided populations shifted and Bannack lost its position as County Seat. In 1890 the building was turned into a plush hotel and operated until it was finally abandoned for good in the 1940s.The lobby of the abandoned Hotel Meade in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana, USA.

Hotel Meade 1

The exquisite lines and delicately aged colors add to the opulence of the Hotel Meade's grand staircase in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana. The building was originally constructed in 1875 to serve as the Beaverhead County Courthouse. But after the gold rush subsided populations shifted and Bannack lost its position as County Seat. In 1890 the building was turned into a plush hotel and operated until it was finally abandoned for good in the 1940s. 

Ghost Town 10

The illuminated staircase of the abandoned Hotel Meade in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana, USA. The building was originally constructed in 1875 to serve as the Beaverhead County Courthouse. But after the gold rush subsided populations shifted and Bannack lost its position as County Seat. In 1890 the building was turned into a plush hotel and operated until it was finally abandoned for good in the 1940s.

Ghost Town 11

The illuminated staircase of the abandoned Hotel Meade in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana, USA. The building was originally constructed in 1875 to serve as the Beaverhead County Courthouse. But after the gold rush subsided populations shifted and Bannack lost its position as County Seat. In 1890 the building was turned into a plush hotel and operated until it was finally abandoned for good in the 1940s.

Buffalo Ranch 1

Autumn cottonwood trees punctuate the landscape along Yellowstone National Park's historic Buffalo Ranch. When bison populations in the park were reduced to fewer than 30 animals, and bison extinction was very possible in the U.S., the Buffalo Ranch was built to help protect and grow the few bison that remained. From 1907 to 1952 this ranch served a crucial role in protecting bison through the winters so that they could grow into the vast and healthy populations that we enjoy today. The Buffalo Ranch is on the National Register of Historic Places. 

Railroad One

An abandoned grain elevator stands as a relic along the tracks of the northern prairie in Montana, USA. In a land once claimed by the Blackfeet Indians, the vast and sparse prairie land eventually gave way to the expansion of Manifest Destiny. Homesteads, mines, ranches, and steamboats all made their way westward onto the prairie. But it was the railroad that proved to be so vital, finally connecting the ports of Seattle and New York.

Menard, Montana 2

Menard, Montana (north of Belgrade) was the terminus of the Milwaukee Railroad branch-line from Bozeman to the rural communities to the north. The railroad was named "The Turkey Red Special" for the variety of wheat raised here. It connected these communities to the Gallatin from 1913-1978. 

Railroad 2

An abandoned grain elevator stands as a relic along the tracks of the northern prairie in Montana's Teton County. In a land once claimed by the Blackfeet Indians, the vast and sparse prairie land eventually gave way to the expansion of Manifest Destiny. Homesteads, mines, ranches, and steamboats all made their way westward onto the prairie. But it was the railroad that proved to be so vital, finally connecting the ports of Seattle and New York.

Menard, Montana 1

Menard, Montana (north of Belgrade) was the terminus of the Milwaukee Railroad branch-line from Bozeman to the rural communities to the north. The railroad was named "The Turkey Red Special" for the variety of wheat raised here. It connected these communities to the Gallatin from 1913-1978. 

Grain Elevator 1

This old elevator sits along what once was the Milwaukee Railroad branch-line from Bozeman to the rural communities to the north. The railroad was named "The Turkey Red Special" for the variety of wheat that was grown here. The raiI connected these communities to the Gallatin from 1913-1978. 

Grain Elevator 1

Pictured is one of the numerous, yet waning, iconic grain elevators which dot the plains as relics of the homesteading years on the northern prairie. The Homestead Act of 1862, signed by President Abraham Lincoln, paved the way for Montana to be the most heavily homesteaded state in America at the time. Though times of drought and economic hardship drove many away, many tough and hearty souls remained and continue the traditions of farming and ranching here today.

Geyser, Montana

One of the numerous, yet waning, iconic grain elevators which dot the plains as relics of the homesteading years on the northern prairie. The Homestead Act of 1862, signed by President Abraham Lincoln, paved the way for Montana to be the most heavily homesteaded state in America at the time. Though times of drought and economic hardship drove many away, many tough and hearty souls remained and continue the traditions of farming and ranching here today.

Ghost Town 1

The kitchen, with original stove, of the long abandoned Hotel Meade in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana, USA. The building was originally constructed in 1875 to serve as the Beaverhead County Courthouse, but in 1890 the building was turned into a plush hotel and operated until it was finally abandoned for good in the 1940s. The cabin seen through the window has taken on a watercolor look due to the original leaded glass windows.

Ghost Town 2

Snow falls on the main street boardwalk of Bannack, Montana, USA. Located on Grasshopper Creek in Beaverhead County, Bannack was established after gold was found there in 1862. It briefly served as the capital of the Montana Territory and at its peak Bannack had a population of around 10,000. But after the gold rush folks began departing steadily until its last residents left for good in the 1970s.

Barber Chair

This original barber chair sits in Skinner’s Saloon in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana, USA. Located on Grasshopper Creek in Beaverhead County, Bannack was established after gold was found there in 1862. It briefly served as the capital of the Montana Territory and at its peak Bannack had a population of around 10,000. But after the gold rush folks began departing steadily until its last residents left for good in the 1970s.

Ghsot Town 3

Snow falls on the main street boardwalk of Bannack, Montana, USA. Located on Grasshopper Creek in Beaverhead County, Bannack was established after gold was found there in 1862. It briefly served as the capital of the Montana Territory and at its peak Bannack had a population of around 10,000. But after the gold rush folks began departing steadily until its last residents left for good in the 1970s.

Ghost Town 12

Located on Grasshopper Creek in Beaverhead County, Montana, Bannack was established after gold was found there in 1862. It briefly served as the capital of the Montana Territory and at its peak Bannack had a population of around 10,000. But after the gold rush folks began departing steadily until its last residents left for good in the 1970s.

Abandoned Homestead 4

A long-abandoned homestead sits under the Big Sky on the Montana prairie. The Homestead Act of 1862, signed by President Abraham Lincoln, paved the way for Montana to be the most heavily homesteaded state in America at the time. Though times of drought and economic hardship drove many away, some tough and hearty souls remained and continue the traditions of farming and ranching there today.

Abandoned Homestead 4

A long-abandoned homestead sits under the Big Sky on the Montana prairie. The Homestead Act of 1862, signed by President Abraham Lincoln, paved the way for Montana to be the most heavily homesteaded state in America at the time. Though times of drought and economic hardship drove many away, some tough and hearty souls remained and continue the traditions of farming and ranching there today.

Virginia City 4

Methodist Church in historic Virginia City, Montana. The church was built in 1875 and the first service it held was the funeral for Alder Gulch discoverer William Fairweather. SINGLE SERIES PRINT: this photograph is part of my "Single Series" which means it is printed one time and one time only. This piece is currently available. It has been printed on a n exquisite Silk Satin material and has a custom frame. Please inquire directly for pricing and additional photos of the finished piece. 

Virginia City 5

Methodist Church in historic Virginia City, Montana. The church was built in 1875 and the first service it held was the funeral for Alder Gulch discoverer William Fairweather. 

Wallpaper 1

Wallpaper inside an abandoned home in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana. 

Wallpaper 2

Wallpaper that remains in an abandoned Montana prairie homestead. 

Mormon Row 1
Mormon Row 2
Mormon Row 3
Grand Teton 4
Grand Teton 5
T.A. Moulton Barn 1
Grand Tetons 15
Ghost Town 9
Hotel Meade 1
Ghost Town 10
Ghost Town 11
Buffalo Ranch 1
Railroad One
Menard, Montana 2
Railroad 2
Menard, Montana 1
Grain Elevator 1
Grain Elevator 1
Geyser, Montana
Ghost Town 1
Ghost Town 2
Barber Chair
Ghsot Town 3
Ghost Town 12
Abandoned Homestead 4
Abandoned Homestead 4
Virginia City 4
Virginia City 5
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Wallpaper 1
Wallpaper 2