Calf No. 1 || Edition of 25 || Archival print on Belgian linen || Solid maple frame rubbed in Danish Oil

Calf No. 1 || Edition of 25 || Archival print on Belgian linen || Solid maple frame rubbed in Danish Oil

 Detail of Wallflower Series print on exquisite Belgian linen

Detail of Wallflower Series print on exquisite Belgian linen

In this series I combine photographs I take of animals and vintage wallpapers. I travel to abandoned homesteads, gritty ghost towns, and buildings dripping with history to photograph these exquisite wallpapers - these glorious relics of an effort made by people who wished to enjoy a simple bit of beauty inside their dwelling on the harsh and hostile American frontier. But time has had its way with these buildings, and in my own way, I take comfort in helping the grace and grandeur of these relics to live on.

 { visit the Galleries page for a list of galleries where these works can be seen & purchased }

  { Moose No. 2 }  I photographed moose in Montana’s Madison Valley. This vintage wallpaper I photographed in the Daly Mansion in the Bitterroot Valley of Montana. The mansion served as the summer residence of Margaret Daly, widow to “Copper King” Marcus Daly. The mansion was completed in 1910 and this wallpaper is original to that period.

{ Moose No. 2 } I photographed moose in Montana’s Madison Valley. This vintage wallpaper I photographed in the Daly Mansion in the Bitterroot Valley of Montana. The mansion served as the summer residence of Margaret Daly, widow to “Copper King” Marcus Daly. The mansion was completed in 1910 and this wallpaper is original to that period.

  { Horse No. 28 }  I photographed this mare and her filly on a ranch in Montana's aptly-named Paradise Valley. I photographed this vintage wallpaper in the Virginian Hotel in Medicine Bow, Wyoming. Now listed on the National Historic Register, The Virginian was completed in 1911 and boasts over 30 guest rooms within its three and a half stories. The building was at the time the largest structure between Denver and Salt Lake City and was built of concrete blocks containing sand drawn from the Medicine Bow River. It was named after the famous 1902 novel, also titled "The Virginian", which was set in Medicine Bow and is credited as being the first Western adventure novel, paving the way for the revered genre which still flourishes today. This wallpaper is original to the early 1900s and the hotel itself has changed little since then. It still serves as a restaurant, watering hole, and gathering hub for locals and a unique place to stay for those traveling through Wyoming's wide and vast Carbon County.

{ Horse No. 28 } I photographed this mare and her filly on a ranch in Montana's aptly-named Paradise Valley. I photographed this vintage wallpaper in the Virginian Hotel in Medicine Bow, Wyoming. Now listed on the National Historic Register, The Virginian was completed in 1911 and boasts over 30 guest rooms within its three and a half stories. The building was at the time the largest structure between Denver and Salt Lake City and was built of concrete blocks containing sand drawn from the Medicine Bow River. It was named after the famous 1902 novel, also titled "The Virginian", which was set in Medicine Bow and is credited as being the first Western adventure novel, paving the way for the revered genre which still flourishes today. This wallpaper is original to the early 1900s and the hotel itself has changed little since then. It still serves as a restaurant, watering hole, and gathering hub for locals and a unique place to stay for those traveling through Wyoming's wide and vast Carbon County.

  { Horse No. 26 }  This piece is made as a triptych with a main image and two side panels. Pictured is a horse I photographed on a ranch in Montana’s Gallatin Valley. The pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper in an abandoned home in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana. The Roe/Graves House was built in 1866 and in addition to living there, William Roe operated a general store and meat market from the home. Roe was one of the Vigilantes who captured and hung the crooked Sheriff Henry Plummer and members of his secret gang, known as Road Agents, in 1864. The solid colored background is the painted walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade, also in Bannack, which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered there.

{ Horse No. 26 } This piece is made as a triptych with a main image and two side panels. Pictured is a horse I photographed on a ranch in Montana’s Gallatin Valley. The pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper in an abandoned home in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana. The Roe/Graves House was built in 1866 and in addition to living there, William Roe operated a general store and meat market from the home. Roe was one of the Vigilantes who captured and hung the crooked Sheriff Henry Plummer and members of his secret gang, known as Road Agents, in 1864. The solid colored background is the painted walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade, also in Bannack, which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered there.

  { Trumpeter Swan No. 1 }  I photographed this trumpeter swan on the National Elk Refuge, just between the town of Jackson Hole and Grand Teton National Park. I photographed this wallpaper in a historic building in Durango, Colorado. In 1939 the Hogan family purchased this building in which they lived in the second floor and opened a western clothing store on the ground floor. For the next 70 years “Hogan’s” was a staple along Main Avenue. This wallpaper was hung in their upstairs apartment, likely in the 40s or 50s. The building now houses Sorrel Sky Gallery and, thanks to the ownership’s insistence on preserving the history of the building and the family who lived and worked there, this wallpaper still hangs there today to create a charming and unique environment to display fantastic artwork in.

{ Trumpeter Swan No. 1 } I photographed this trumpeter swan on the National Elk Refuge, just between the town of Jackson Hole and Grand Teton National Park. I photographed this wallpaper in a historic building in Durango, Colorado. In 1939 the Hogan family purchased this building in which they lived in the second floor and opened a western clothing store on the ground floor. For the next 70 years “Hogan’s” was a staple along Main Avenue. This wallpaper was hung in their upstairs apartment, likely in the 40s or 50s. The building now houses Sorrel Sky Gallery and, thanks to the ownership’s insistence on preserving the history of the building and the family who lived and worked there, this wallpaper still hangs there today to create a charming and unique environment to display fantastic artwork in.

  { Horse No. 25 }  I photographed this horse on the a Montana ranch in the aptly named Paradise Valley along the northern boundary of Yellowstone National Park. I photographed this wallpaper in a historic building in Durango, Colorado. In 1939 the Hogan family purchased this building in which they lived in the second floor and opened a western clothing store on the ground floor. For the next 70 years “Hogan’s” was a staple along Main Avenue. This wallpaper was hung in their upstairs apartment, likely in the 40s or 50s. The building now houses Sorrel Sky Gallery and, thanks to the ownership’s insistence on preserving the history of the building and the family who lived and worked there, this wallpaper still hangs there today to create a charming and unique environment to display fantastic artwork in.

{ Horse No. 25 } I photographed this horse on the a Montana ranch in the aptly named Paradise Valley along the northern boundary of Yellowstone National Park. I photographed this wallpaper in a historic building in Durango, Colorado. In 1939 the Hogan family purchased this building in which they lived in the second floor and opened a western clothing store on the ground floor. For the next 70 years “Hogan’s” was a staple along Main Avenue. This wallpaper was hung in their upstairs apartment, likely in the 40s or 50s. The building now houses Sorrel Sky Gallery and, thanks to the ownership’s insistence on preserving the history of the building and the family who lived and worked there, this wallpaper still hangs there today to create a charming and unique environment to display fantastic artwork in.

  { Moose No. 1 }  I photographed this bull moose in Montana's incredible Madison Valley. The patterns I photographed in the National Historic District of Butte, Montana. These two wallpapers hang together in a shack in what is known as the "Cabbage Patch", a shanty town that was once filled with hastily-built shacks and began in the 1880s. These shacks were built of found lumber and scrap metal and folks who lived there would line the interior walls with found materials in an attempt to insulate themselves from the harsh Montana winters. Scoured wallpaper scraps, cardboard, cloth, and newspapers would be used. These wallpaper scraps still hang together in one of only four Cabbage Patch dwellings to stand the test of time.

{ Moose No. 1 } I photographed this bull moose in Montana's incredible Madison Valley. The patterns I photographed in the National Historic District of Butte, Montana. These two wallpapers hang together in a shack in what is known as the "Cabbage Patch", a shanty town that was once filled with hastily-built shacks and began in the 1880s. These shacks were built of found lumber and scrap metal and folks who lived there would line the interior walls with found materials in an attempt to insulate themselves from the harsh Montana winters. Scoured wallpaper scraps, cardboard, cloth, and newspapers would be used. These wallpaper scraps still hang together in one of only four Cabbage Patch dwellings to stand the test of time.

  { Bison No. 2  } Pictured is a bison I photographed at the National Bison Range in western Montana. The pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper in an abandoned home in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana. The Roe/Graves House was built in 1866 and in addition to living there, William Roe operated a general store and meat market from the home. Roe was one of the Vigilantes who captured and hung the crooked Sheriff Henry Plummer and members of his secret gang, known as Road Agents, in 1864. The solid colored background is the painted walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade, also in Bannack, which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered there.

{ Bison No. 2 } Pictured is a bison I photographed at the National Bison Range in western Montana. The pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper in an abandoned home in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana. The Roe/Graves House was built in 1866 and in addition to living there, William Roe operated a general store and meat market from the home. Roe was one of the Vigilantes who captured and hung the crooked Sheriff Henry Plummer and members of his secret gang, known as Road Agents, in 1864. The solid colored background is the painted walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade, also in Bannack, which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered there.

  { Calf No. 2 }  pictured is a calf from a Montana ranch. The floral pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper from the Kramer Dress Shop, built in 1863, in the town of Virginia City, Montana. Virginia City is a National Historic Landmark and began in 1863 when gold was discovered in Alder Gulch.

{ Calf No. 2 } pictured is a calf from a Montana ranch. The floral pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper from the Kramer Dress Shop, built in 1863, in the town of Virginia City, Montana. Virginia City is a National Historic Landmark and began in 1863 when gold was discovered in Alder Gulch.

  { Horse No. 16  } Pictured is a horse which was photographed in Southwest Montana on the edge of the Little Bighorn National Battlefield. The pattern laid over it is a photograph of wallpaper from an abandoned homestead on the Northern prairie of Montana.

{ Horse No. 16 } Pictured is a horse which was photographed in Southwest Montana on the edge of the Little Bighorn National Battlefield. The pattern laid over it is a photograph of wallpaper from an abandoned homestead on the Northern prairie of Montana.

  { Horse No. 21 }  I photographed this horse on a Montana ranch near Yellowstone. The floral pattern is vintage wallpaper I photographed inside the S.R. Buford Store in the National Historic Landmark of Virginia City, Montana. The S.R. Buford was built in 1874 and was the town’s first brick building. The texture in the background is from plaster walls I photographed in the Hotel Meade, originally the county courthouse, built in 1875 in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana.

{ Horse No. 21 } I photographed this horse on a Montana ranch near Yellowstone. The floral pattern is vintage wallpaper I photographed inside the S.R. Buford Store in the National Historic Landmark of Virginia City, Montana. The S.R. Buford was built in 1874 and was the town’s first brick building. The texture in the background is from plaster walls I photographed in the Hotel Meade, originally the county courthouse, built in 1875 in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana.

  { Horse No. 20  } Pictured is a mustang from the Hawk band of the Pryor Mountains Wild Horse Range in Montana. The floral pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper from the Kramer Dress Shop, built in 1863, in the town of Virginia City, Montana. Virginia City is a National Historic Landmark and began in 1863 when gold was discovered in Alder Gulch. The solid colored background are the painted walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade which still stands in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana.

{ Horse No. 20 } Pictured is a mustang from the Hawk band of the Pryor Mountains Wild Horse Range in Montana. The floral pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper from the Kramer Dress Shop, built in 1863, in the town of Virginia City, Montana. Virginia City is a National Historic Landmark and began in 1863 when gold was discovered in Alder Gulch. The solid colored background are the painted walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade which still stands in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana.

  { Horse No. 22  } Pictured is a ranch horse from a ranch outside Yellowstone National Park. The pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper in an abandoned home in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana. The Roe/Graves House was built in 1866 and in addition to living there, William Roe operated a general store and meat market from the home. Roe was one of the Vigilantes who captured and hung the crooked Sheriff Henry Plummer and members of his secret gang, known as Road Agents, in 1864. The solid colored background is the painted walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade, also in Bannack, which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered there.

{ Horse No. 22 } Pictured is a ranch horse from a ranch outside Yellowstone National Park. The pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper in an abandoned home in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana. The Roe/Graves House was built in 1866 and in addition to living there, William Roe operated a general store and meat market from the home. Roe was one of the Vigilantes who captured and hung the crooked Sheriff Henry Plummer and members of his secret gang, known as Road Agents, in 1864. The solid colored background is the painted walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade, also in Bannack, which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered there.

  { Horse No. 23 }  Pictured is a foal from the Blackfeet Reservation along the Rocky Mountain Front in Montana. The pattern is vintage wallpaper I photographed in an abandoned home in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered along Grasshopper Creek. Augustus Graeter arrived in Bannack from Nebraska in 1862 and built this home shortly thereafter. Through the years additions were made as various families continued to live there even as the town itself was in decline. This wallpaper, titled Home on the Range, is from the 1950s and is still hanging there today. Though mas-produced at the time, it has an air of folk art to it which lends to its nostalgic look and feel.

{ Horse No. 23 } Pictured is a foal from the Blackfeet Reservation along the Rocky Mountain Front in Montana. The pattern is vintage wallpaper I photographed in an abandoned home in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered along Grasshopper Creek. Augustus Graeter arrived in Bannack from Nebraska in 1862 and built this home shortly thereafter. Through the years additions were made as various families continued to live there even as the town itself was in decline. This wallpaper, titled Home on the Range, is from the 1950s and is still hanging there today. Though mas-produced at the time, it has an air of folk art to it which lends to its nostalgic look and feel.

  { Horse No. 19  } Pictured is a mustang from the Hawk band of the Pryor Mountains Wild Horse Range in Montana. The floral pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper from the Kramer Dress Shop, built in 1863, in the town of Virginia City, Montana. Virginia City is a National Historic Landmark and began in 1863 when gold was discovered in Alder Gulch. The solid colored background are the painted walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade which still stands in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana.

{ Horse No. 19 } Pictured is a mustang from the Hawk band of the Pryor Mountains Wild Horse Range in Montana. The floral pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper from the Kramer Dress Shop, built in 1863, in the town of Virginia City, Montana. Virginia City is a National Historic Landmark and began in 1863 when gold was discovered in Alder Gulch. The solid colored background are the painted walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade which still stands in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana.

  { Horse No. 24 }  I photographed this horse on the Blackfeet Reservation along Montana’s sweeping Rocky Mountain Front. I photographed this wallpaper in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana in the Greater House. Like the many others seeking to better their condition, Augustus Graeter arrived in Bannack from Nebraska in 1862 and built this home shortly thereafter. Through the years additions were made as various families continued to live there even as the town itself was in decline. The solid colored background is the painted plaster walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade, also in Bannack, which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered along Grasshopper Creek. The town was the first Capitol of the Montana Territory.

{ Horse No. 24 } I photographed this horse on the Blackfeet Reservation along Montana’s sweeping Rocky Mountain Front. I photographed this wallpaper in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana in the Greater House. Like the many others seeking to better their condition, Augustus Graeter arrived in Bannack from Nebraska in 1862 and built this home shortly thereafter. Through the years additions were made as various families continued to live there even as the town itself was in decline. The solid colored background is the painted plaster walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade, also in Bannack, which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered along Grasshopper Creek. The town was the first Capitol of the Montana Territory.

  { Elk No. 1 }  Pictured is a bull elk I photographed in Yellowstone National Park. I photographed this wallpaper in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana in the Greater House. Augustus Graeter arrived in Bannack from Nebraska in 1862 and built this home shortly thereafter. Through the years additions were made as various families continued to live there even as the town itself was in decline. The solid colored background is the painted plaster walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade, also in Bannack, which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered along Grasshopper Creek. The town was the first Capitol of the Montana Territory.

{ Elk No. 1 } Pictured is a bull elk I photographed in Yellowstone National Park. I photographed this wallpaper in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana in the Greater House. Augustus Graeter arrived in Bannack from Nebraska in 1862 and built this home shortly thereafter. Through the years additions were made as various families continued to live there even as the town itself was in decline. The solid colored background is the painted plaster walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade, also in Bannack, which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered along Grasshopper Creek. The town was the first Capitol of the Montana Territory.

  { Calf No. 1 }  pictured is a calf from a Montana ranch. The floral pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper from the Kramer Dress Shop, built in 1863, in the town of Virginia City, Montana. Virginia City is a National Historic Landmark and began in 1863 when gold was discovered in Alder Gulch.

{ Calf No. 1 } pictured is a calf from a Montana ranch. The floral pattern is a photograph I made of vintage wallpaper from the Kramer Dress Shop, built in 1863, in the town of Virginia City, Montana. Virginia City is a National Historic Landmark and began in 1863 when gold was discovered in Alder Gulch.

  { Bison No. 1 }  Pictured is a bison I photographed in the National Bison Range in Western Montana. I photographed this wallpaper in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana in the Greater House. Augustus Graeter arrived in Bannack from Nebraska in 1862 and built this home shortly thereafter. Through the years additions were made as various families continued to live there even as the town itself was in decline. The solid colored background is the painted plaster walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade, also in Bannack, which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered along Grasshopper Creek. The town was the first Capitol of the Montana Territory.

{ Bison No. 1 } Pictured is a bison I photographed in the National Bison Range in Western Montana. I photographed this wallpaper in the ghost town of Bannack, Montana in the Greater House. Augustus Graeter arrived in Bannack from Nebraska in 1862 and built this home shortly thereafter. Through the years additions were made as various families continued to live there even as the town itself was in decline. The solid colored background is the painted plaster walls of the abandoned Hotel Meade, also in Bannack, which was founded in 1862 after gold was discovered along Grasshopper Creek. The town was the first Capitol of the Montana Territory.